Philomath

a lover of learning
Louis le Brocquy, Road, Beara, Peninsula, 1990 watercolour, 18 x 26 cm, ARW1002
via www.anne-madden.com

Louis le Brocquy, Road, Beara, Peninsula, 1990
watercolour, 18 x 26 cm, ARW1002

via www.anne-madden.com

Louis le Brocquy, Image of Samuel Beckett, 1979 oil on canvas, 80 x 80 cm, A.R.442 
via www.anne-madden.com

Louis le Brocquy, Image of Samuel Beckett, 1979
oil on canvas, 80 x 80 cm, A.R.442 

via www.anne-madden.com


Gravity-Defying Land Art by Cornelia Konrads via Colossal

German artist Cornelia Konrads creates mind-bending site-specific installations in public spaces, sculpture parks and private gardens around the world. Her work is frequently punctuated by the illusion of weightlessness, where stacked objects like logs, fences, and doorways appear to be suspended in mid-air, reinforcing their temporary nature as if the installation is beginning to dissolve before your very eyes.

One Step Beyond: Richard Long via The Guardian

At 22, Richard Long changed the face of British sculpture. Yet his works are as simple as a track in the snow or a stone circle – left to nature and passersby. As Tate Britain brings his art indoors, he tells Sean O’Hagan how walking has inspired his life’s work

Richard Long A Circle in Ireland,1975, Doolin

Richard Long A Circle in Ireland,1975, Doolin

Graft punk: Breaking the law to help urban trees bear fruit via Grist

Now this San Francisco-based group called the Guerrilla Grafters is challenging the very notion of the ornamental fruit tree. And they’re working outside the law (city officials don’t like rotten fruit on the sidewalk, nor the liability it suggests). They’re covertly grafting — a practice of connecting two branches in a way that will allow their vascular tissues to join together — fruit tree limbs onto the trunks of ornamental cherry, plum, and pear trees.

From the studio of...Sean Taylor

"Sean Taylor is a socially engaged sound artist who has been working collaboratively for the past seventeen years. Many of his projects are realised in public spaces and involve participation from various communities of interest. Since 1999, Sean Taylor and Mikael Fernström have together formed the science/art collaboration of Softday." via From the studio of…

Fritz Haeg's Edible Estates

The “Edible Estates” themselves are beautiful sculpted landscapes in contrast to the average backyard plot. Putting benevolent things in places that challenge traditional development patterns explains Haeg, “forces you to check yourself and ask, ‘Why am I feeling threatened by this vegetable garden?’” (excerpt from greenmuseum.org)